Picture a person undergoing a cosmetic treatment. The chances are the first image — or one of the first 50 images — that popped into your head wasn’t a man getting lip fillers.

Maybe it should be.

“Men rarely had anything done other than hair restoration 40 years ago,” said Dr. Toby Mayer, a Beverly Hills facial plastic surgeon. “Today they are closing the gap with women.”

Dr. Mayer said the popularity of male cosmetic procedures has risen dramatically, and it’s not just more men getting hair transplants. He said that liposuction, fillers, and Botox are among the most popular male treatments in his office. There were 1.3 million male cosmetic procedures in 2016, up three percent from 2015, according to a report from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Dr. J. David Holcomb has experienced a similar trend in his Sarasota, Florida, practice.

“Men are gradually becoming more accepting of surgical treatments and the ‘investment’ of downtime required, but also of concept of ‘maintenance’ treatments such as quarterly Botox,” Dr. Holcomb said.

Hair transplants remain popular, but many men are also getting treatments to help them look refreshed. Dr. Holcomb said it’s common for his male patients to ask for treatments to reduce heavy eyelids, improve facial fullness, and lessen lines and wrinkles, including eyelid surgery, laser skin resurfacing, and fillers like Belotero. All in an effort to look younger and more vibrant.

Male celebrities have long embraced cosmetic treatments, but there remained a stigma around other men visiting a plastic surgeon. That is diminishing rapidly, in part due to better marketing, says Dr. Mayer. One of Botox’s latest ad campaigns targets men and features former pro football player Deion Sanders after all.

Doctors on RealSelf say they expect the trend to continue with more men becoming interested in surgical and non-surgical treatments. Some are even inspired to try treatments by their spouses are doing it.

“Men are coming in with their spouses or significant others for double consultations,” Dr. Holcomb said.

Have questions? Ask a doctor.